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20121129
20121207
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
of weeks. but going over the fiscal cliff is serious business, and i'm here seriously trying to resolve it and i would hope the white house would get serious as well. >> is this based on your meeting with secretary geithner or your phone call with president obama last night. could you tell us something about that phone call? >> well, we had a very nice conversation last night. it was direct. and straightforward. but this assessment i give you today would be a product of both of those conversations. >> how much would you be open to the idea of discretionary spending cuts as part of a down payment to get to a longer range solution on entitlements and tax reforms? >> there are a lot of options on the table including that one. >> before the election you were asked whether if obama won taxes would have to go up. i are acknowledging that they will. >> the day after the election i came here and made it clear that the republicans would put revenue on the table as a way to begin to move the process to get this resolved. >> my question is, what message do you have for people who look at the negot
person, everyone talks about what the fiscal cliff could do to small business, what obama care can do for small business, but you said we shouldn't worry about that so much, that we should get some sort of compromise in order to keep moving and keep talking and keep moving forward? >> well, i think that it was pretty clear during the course of the election and since and even in the president's speech today where he said he's willing to give on some revenue and some spending cuts, he's proposed some, he's already passed some into law. and beyond that, just from my perspective, what i see is that we know that we're a confidence-based economy, we're 70% of the economy driven by consumer spending and anything that puts a crimp in consumer spending is not good for the economy. so to put a tax rise, a tax rate increase for the middle class makes no sense to me. someone who makes 50, 60, $70,000 a year will lose and will take away a lot of discretionary purchases from people like me and travel and a whole host of other areas. i hope our leaders in washington are listening and they take the s
to avoid the fiscal cliff happening? >> i have no doubt that people are working hard to get a deal. we have the president re-elected and have a new congress, think it's right they get down to the business of sorting this out. i think america's got to think that what it needs to do is get growth in its economy, as well. and it needs to get growth by trade and exporting. and i think what we're missing at the moment is a global agreement whereby the big powers try to work on the economy. you have to have fiscal problems and you also have to have growth. that's the key for the future. there's a global deal waiting to be done, with china, europe, india also involved in this, and of course, america itself, where we could build the confidence that's necessary to get high levels of growth around the world. >> finally, gordon brown, i couldn't let you go without asking your view of the single biggest news story to hit the planet in the last week. it is, of course, the royal baby. >> it's incredibly important that we give them the privacy because her health is a massive issue. but you can see that br
about the tax component of this fiscal cliff and it absolutely is a tax component. we talk about taxes as it relates to small businesses and creating jobs. we talk about taxes as it relates to individual families and being able to make ends meet. but what this chart shows, mr. speaker, is spending and tax revenue of the federal government of the united states of america from 1947 out to 2077. and you can't see the intory indicate detail here, mr. speaker, but what you can see here from far, far away is this green line that represents tax revenue is a relatively flat and constant line. as a general rule it doesn't matter whether tax rate were the 90% marginal rates, the 70% marginal rates that they were when john f. kennedy was president and he cut taxes or whether they were 28 marginal rate during the reagan years. mr. speaker, it turns out -- and this is of no surprise to you -- turns out the american people are pretty smart. and if you raise taxes on this behavior, they switch to this behavior. and if you raise taxes on that behavior, they switch to this behavior. because at the end
to avert that fiscal cliff that we hear so much about. yesterday, after weeks of delay, and as the days dwindle and taxes are set to go up for millions of families and businesses, republicans in the house finally showed up at the negotiating table. and now we know why they've been holding their cards so close it their vest. their proposal would raise taxes on millions of middle-class families. their plan to raise $800 billion in revenue by eliminating popular tax deductions and credits would reach deep into pockets of middle-class families. republicans are so intent on protecting low tax rates for millionaires and billionaires, they're willing to sacrifice middle-class families' economic security to do so. at the first of the year, middle-class families, will get an average of $200 i,200 in additional taxes they'll have to pay. their proposal was short on specifics but we do know from independent analysis that it is impossible to raise enough revenue and make a dent in our deficit without using one of two things -- raising tax rates on the top 2% or raising taxes on the middle class. an
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)